Like apples of gold in settings of silver Is a word spoken in right circumstances. Proverbs 25:11




























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Eisegesis. Reading a meaning into the text of Scripture that is foreign to it in its context, or to the broader context of Scripture. The term is coined from the opposite of the Greek verb exęgeomai (1834), which means to "explain." We derive our transliterated English verb or adjective exegete or the noun exegesis from exęgeomai, used, for example, in John 1:18. The Greek prefix "ex" means "out of," while the Greek prefix "eis" means "into." Thus eisegesis refers to "explaining" a foreign meaning "into" the text of Scripture. Nondispensationalists, for example, are guilty of eisegesis, I believe, when they insist that the "land of Canaan" promises God made to the physical descendants of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob are fulfilled in the Church's inheritance of the New Earth and New Jerusalem.

Elder.  A leader of Israel in the Old Testament; a leader of a local church in the New Testament.  In the OT elders represented the nation (Ex. 3:15-18) and individual cities (Ruth 4:1-11).  In the NT, elders were appointed in fledgling churches (Acts 14:23; Tit. 1:5).  The primary task of a NT elder is to shepherd the flock, or local church (Acts 20:28).  Shepherding God’s flock involves guarding (Acts 20:28-31), feeding (John 21:15-17), and guiding (Rev. 7:16-17).  Elders’ qualifications are listed in 1 Tim. 3:1-7 and Titus 1:5-9.  Elders’ motivation and style are described in 1 Peter 5:1-4.  The NT word for elder is presbuteros (from whence comes the Presbyterian Church); the word describing the job description of elders is episkopos, bishop, which means overseer.  The Episcopalian Church derives its name from this word.  There are only two offices in the New Testament church, that of elder and that of deacon. See Bishop.  See Biblical Eldership.

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Elect, Election, Chosen.  God’s selection of individuals and peoples for service or salvation.  

The verb "to choose" is eklegomai, (1586), the noun "chosen one(s)" or "choice" is eklogę (1589). NT examples of God or Christ choosing (verbal form, eklegomai1586), people for service include Luke 6:13; John 6:70; 13:18; 15:16; Acts 1:2; 15:7. NT examples of God or Christ choosing (verbal form) people for salvation include Mark 13:20; John 15:19; Eph. 1:4; James 2:5.  God's choosing of the patriarchs of Israel can be seen in Acts 13:17. 

Examples of those who are the "chosen one(s)" or of God's "choice" (the noun, eklogę 1589) include Saul for service (Acts 9:15), of God's choice of Jacob over Esau (Rom. 9:11); of God's choice of certain Israelis for salvation (Rom. 11:5, 17); of God's choice of the nation of Israel (Rom. 11:28); of God's choice of NT believers for salvation (1 Thess. 1:4; 2 Pet. 1:10).

The Old Testament is replete with examples of God’s choices.  God chose Abraham (Gen. 12:1-7), Isaac (Gen. 17:18-21), Jacob (Gen. 25:21-23), and the nation of Israel as a whole (Ex. 19:1-6; Deut. 7:1-8).  God chose Moses as deliverer and prophet (Ex. 3:1-4:31), Gideon as deliverer and judge (Judges 6:1-24), David as a king (1 Sam. 16:1-14), and Jeremiah as a prophet (Jer. 1:1-10).  

In the New Testament, Jesus chose Saul (later called Paul) to bear His name before Gentiles, kings, and the sons of Israel (Acts 9:1-16). Furthermore, there are New Testament Scriptures which reveal that God has chosen some to salvation (Eph. 1:4; 2 Thess. 2:13; Tit. 1:1).  It cannot be argued that God is unfair in choosing.  If God were merely fair, all would be eternally damned.  God has the right to be more than fair, generous, or merciful, with whomever He desires (Matt. 20:1-16; Rom. 9:6-18), and as Creator, He has the right to do whatever He wishes with His creatures (Rom. 9:19-21).  Election does not violate man’s freedom to choose (Rev. 22:17).  Frankly, however, inasmuch as fallen man is dead in his sins, hopelessly influenced by the ungodly world, manipulated by Satan, and strangled by the lusts of his own flesh, his freedom to choose God has been utterly compromised (Eph. 2:1-3).  He is a slave to sin and inimical to God.  As such, he does that which he wishes to do. Unless God works in the heart of a human, none will ever wish to choose Him (Rom. 3:9-20).  So if any are to be saved, God must choose them.  God’s choice is not based upon man’s merit, for as a sinner estranged from God, he has none.  God’s choice is solely gracious, and for that He is to be praised (Rom. 9:11; Eph. 2:8-10).  In today's America, for example, there is an ongoing battle over what constitutes fairness. Political Conservatives believe that fairness means providing equal opportunity, while political Progressives believe fairness means providing equal outcomes, at least up to a point. Let us not be guilty of imposing human "feel-good" definitions of fairness on God. God clearly issues an invitation, and thus the opportunity to all to be saved, but He imposes His invitation on no one. Every man does that which he wishes to do (Mark 10:17-23). But men are so trapped and deadened by sin that unless God chooses some, none will ever be saved. Those who have been elected, or chosen by God are calledFor a fuller discussion of these matters, see God's Part in Salvation - Election.

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Enthronement Psalms. These are psalms which celebrate God reigning as the greatest King. Eschatologically, they anticipate the return of Jesus Christ to reign over the earth in righteousness and equity in His Millennial Kingdom. Ultimately they anticipate the Co-Regency of God and Christ from New Jerusalem over the New Earth in a pristine New Universe in which only righteousness exists. Enthronement psalms include Psalm 47; 93; 95-99.

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Eschatological. Descriptive of that which has to do with last things or end-times yet to come. When I say that an event is eschatological, I mean that it has to do with the Rapture, or the Tribulation, or Christ’s Second Coming, or His Millennial Kingdom, or the Final Revolt, or the Destruction of the Existing Universe, or the Great White Throne Judgment, or Eternity in the New Jerusalem and on New Earth, or a combination of any or all of those events. But a great many scholars who hold to a nonliteral  hermeneutic tend to dump all those ingredients into one big kettle that all comes to pass, in their view, at about the same time, and they label it "eschatological." What they mix up (the pun is deliberate) turns out to be a singular, amorphous, bland eschatological stew. For example, a great many of them do not recognize the existence of a literal 1000-year reign of Christ here upon earth because they don't take prophecy literally. Many of them believe we are already in the "nonliteral" (to them) millennium now because, in their view Christ is presently reigning as King up in heaven. (I strongly disagree with them, but that's another story. I believe Christ is presently serving as Priest, not as King. That is a major point of the book of Hebrews. His reign as King awaits His return to earth.) So they tend to mix up all the separate events to which I have referred above into one ill-differentiated, non-literal eschatological stew that will all happen at some nondescript time in the distant future. To illustrate further, passages which to me speak clearly of Christ's Millennial rule here on earth (Isa. 2:1-4; Ezek. 40:1-48:35; Zech. 14:8-11, 16-24) for a thousand years (Rev. 20:1-7) nonliteralists lump together with passages such as Rev. 21:1-22:5 that clearly describe eternity, which the Bible teaches is at least a thousand years after Christ's return to rule the earth. So the reader must distinguish what a particular writer means by the word "eschatological."

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Eschatology.  The study of last things.  Eschatology deals with the prophetic Scriptures.  WordExplain adopts a dispensational approach to prophetic Scriptures and holds that Israel has an abiding place in God’s plan for both the present and the future earth.  The Church has not replaced Israel in God’s plans, but rather presently occupies God’s program of blessing and evangelism.  Israel is currently in a state of temporary blindness (Rom. 11), but that will only last until the times of the Gentiles have been completed (Luke 21:24).  The main events of eschatology include the present Church Age, terminated by the Rapture, followed by the Tribulation, Christ’s Second Coming and Millennial Kingdom, the Final Revolt, the Destruction of the Existing Universe, the Great White Throne Judgment, and Eternity in the New Jerusalem and on New Earth.

Eternity.  Infinite existence backward and forward in time.  Once man comes into existence, he exists forward in time into eternity, either in a state of life or death.  For humans death is never cessation of existence, but rather separation from God and, ultimately, from all that is good.  Life is union with God, and, because God is good, participation in goodness.  God, as an infinite being, has always existed and always will exist.  God has existed from eternity past and will exist, unchanged, into eternity future.  God is truly eternal, the only One without beginning or ending.

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Eternal Kingdom. Technically speaking, the reign of Jesus Christ commencing with His Second Coming in power and extending into eternity, since the angel Gabriel assured Mary her son would sit on "the throne of His father David," "reign over the house of Jacob forever" in a kingdom that would "have no end" (Luke 1:32-33). Practically speaking, however, we define the Eternal Kingdom as that portion of Christ's reign in which He "hands over the kingdom to the God and Father, when He has abolished all rule and all authority and power, having placed "all His enemies under His feet" and having abolished the last enemy, death (1 Cor. 15:24-26). 

That is why, from a practical point of view, we must limit the Eternal Kingdom to the co-regency of God and the Son from their single throne in New Jerusalem. Though Jesus begins His Millennial reign by vanquishing all his human enemies (Zech. 14:1-15; Rev. 19:11-21; Ezek. 20:33-38; Matt. 25:1-46), not all his enemies will be destroyed. His arch enemy, Satan, will be restricted for the thousand year duration of His earthly reign (Rev. 20:1-3), but then he will be released from the abyss. At the conclusion of the Millennium, he will succeed in deceiving incredible numbers of unregenerate humans, who will revolt against the King and His administration. They will be thwarted by fire, which comes down from heaven (Rev. 20:7-9). Satan will be seized and deposited in "the lake of fire and brimstone (Rev. 20:10)," the existing universe will be destroyed (2 Pet. 3:7-12; Rev. 20:11), and the wicked dead of all ages will be judged and deposited into the "lake of fire," which constitutes the Second Death (Rev. 20:11-15).

Then God will create New Heaven and New Earth, a universe in which only righteousness exists (2 Pet. 3:13; Rev. 21:1, 8, 27; 22:15). New Jerusalem will descend out of heaven, heretofore, the abode of God. From this point on both God the Father and Christ the Son will dwell with man eternally in New Jerusalem in conjunction with New Earth, inhabited by a multitude of nations, all of whom have 24-hour access to the capital city.

In the Eternal Kingdom, there will no longer be any sea, God will dwell among man. He will wipe away all tears, and He will banish forever death, mourning, and pain (Rev. 21:1-4). The capital city, New Jerusalem, will be the home of both Israel and the Church. It will be a city of prodigious size and breath-taking beauty and glory. "From the single throne of God and of the Lamb" will flow "the river of water of life," and residents of both New Jerusalem and New Earth will have ready access, not only to the fruit of the "tree of life," but also to the energizing benefit of its leaves.

God the Father and Christ the Son will be seated on their throne in a co-regency throughout eternity. His slaves will serve Him (meaning both worship Him and serve Him) in intimate fellowship with Him, and they will reign with  Him forever. Evidently there will be work to do on behalf of the King throughout eternity. The word reign, basileuo, is the standard word for a king reigning. There will be no opposition to God and Christ, but there will be administrative requirements in New Jerusalem and on New Earth. Conquest, police action, detection, prosecution, judiciary action, and incarceration, no. Organization and administration, yes.

What a glorious, eternal time of fellowship between God and man and among men, and service on behalf of the King will be the lot of all the redeemed for all ages!

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Eternal Life.  Eternal life is union with God through Jesus Christ, and since God is good, eternal life is the experience of goodness into infinite time forward.  Man, fallen sinner that he is, lives in a state of spiritual death, separated from God, and thus dying physically.  If his spiritual death remains unremedied, his decaying physical life will be terminated in physical death.  Then his end can only be second death, eternal separation from God in the Lake of Fire and Brimstone.  Eternal life can only be obtained through faith in Jesus Christ (John 3:16).  Faith in Jesus appropriates for oneself Jesus’ sacrificial death on behalf of sinners.  Faith accepts Jesus’ payment, and God acquits or justifies the believing sinner, crediting him with righteousness and eternal life.  Eternal life is a present possession of every believer in Jesus.  The ultimate end of eternal life is eternal existence in fellowship with God and Jesus in New Jerusalem upon New Earth.

Eternal Security. The position that genuine believers in Jesus Christ are recipients of eternal life -- a condition that, by definition, cannot be terminated. This means that believers, though not perfect, are perfectly forgiven. As heirs of God and joint-heirs with Christ, they cannot lose their salvation. Salvation is by grace through faith, without any merits on the part of the redeemed. There is nothing we could do to earn our salvation, and there is nothing we can do to keep our salvation. That is God's business. Our eternal salvation depends not upon our faithfulness, for we are not faithful. Rather it depends on God's faithfulness. 

There are some passages which, at face value, might be construed as teaching that one can lose his salvation. There are, for example, warning passages in the book of Hebrews. But understood in context, these passages do not teach that one can lose his salvation. The reader is welcome to consider the article, "Does Hebrews 10:26-31 teach that Christians can lose their salvation?" WordExplain answers that question in the negative. There is such a thing as being a carnal or flesly Christian, as distasteful as that may be (1 Cor. 3:1-3). God does discipline His children (Heb. 12:3-13). There is such a thing as Christians who die a physical death because they are so far out of fellowship with God (Acts 5:1-11; 1 Cor. 5:1-5; 11:27-31; 1 John 5:16-17). But even if a Christian builds with wood, hay, and stubble upon the foundation of Christ, and though he loses all for which he has labored and suffers loss, yet he himself will be saved (1 Cor. 3:10-15).

There are many reasons why it is accurate to state that the New Testament teaches that believers in Jesus cannot lose their salvation. Among them are the following:

(1) The nature of eternal life. The New Testament is clear that those who trust in Jesus, the Messiah, are granted eternal life, literally, "life into the ages." If the life we are given is eternal, how can it be terminated? That is a non sequitur. See, for example, John 3:15, 16, 36; 4:14, 36; 5:24; 6:40, 47, 54, 68; 10:28; 17:2-3.

(2) Those who trust in Jesus Christ, being forgiven, are under no condemnation whatever. Since Christ has fully paid the penalty for their sins, they cannot suffer double jeopardy. Jesus has fully paid the penalty for their sins. Their is no further charge against them. They stand uncondemned before God legally. John 3:18; 5:24; Rom. 5:16; 8:1, 33-34.

(3) Jesus declared that His sheep hear His voice, He knows them, and they follow Him. He gives them eternal life. They will never perish, and no one can snatch them out of His hand. Furthermore, Jesus' Father, who gave Him His sheep, is greater than all. Absolutely no one is able to snatch them out of His Father's hand. John 10:26-29.

(4) The Apostle Paul speaks of a group of people in Romans 8:29-30. From start to finish, this is the same group of people. None are added; none are subtracted. This group of people consists of those whom (a) God foreknew as His own from some time in the dateless past. (b) This same group of people God predestined to be conformed to the image of His Son. (c) This same group of people He called. (d) This same group of people God justified. (e) This same group of people God glorified. There is no leakage from this group. I know of no stronger statement anywhere in Scripture of the security of the believer than this passage in Romans.

(5) Nothing in all of creation can separate us from the love of God in Christ (Romans 8:31-39).

(6) The gifts and calling of God are irrevocable (Romans 11:29). God does not choose someone for eternal salvation and then discard them. Whomever God chooses God stands behind. God is not a disloyal God. He is the consummately loyal God to His own. He disciplines His own (Heb. 12:3-13), but He never abandons them.

(7) The permanent presence of the indwelling Spirit. To His followers Jesus revealed that the Helper, or Advocate that the Father would send them would remain with them forever (John 14:16-17). How could that  possibly be true if those who believe in Jesus can lose their salvation?

(8) Every believer in Christ  has been sealed with the Holy Spirit. That sealing is an inviolable, unbreakable seal. He is God's downpayment, God's guarantee of our inheritance. We are God's possession and He will redeem His possession -- the Holy Spirit is His guarantee that He will do so (Ephesians 1:13-14). We are sealed for the day of our redemption by the Holy Spirit (Eph. 4:30). It is unthinkable that we could lose our salvation, for then God would lose His Spirit with whom He has sealed us.

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Eternal State.  Popularly, heaven as it exists in eternity.  More accurately, the eternal state consists of New Heaven and New Earth with New Jerusalem coming down out of heaven to exist as the eternal capital city of redeemed and immortal humanity upon New Earth.

Evolution.  The unproven theory, unquestioningly assumed as fact by most in the scientific, academic, and political communities, that all that exists today sprang explosively and thus miraculously by accident from disorganized matter from a point in time about 4.6 billion years ago.  Evolution assumes the eternity, or at least the pre-existence of matter, with no real attempts to explain its origin.  Evolution as defined here refers to macro evolution on both a cosmic and biological continuum. It refers to the development of solar, astral, and galactic bodies from random chance, as well as the miraculous emergence of life and subsequent transition from one biological specie to another, also by random chance.  (Creationists freely admit the existence of micro evolution, development within a specie.)  The theory of evolution requires that one believes (the word is deliberately chosen) that order proceeded by accident from disorder, that life proceeded by accident from non-life, that purpose proceeded by accident from meaninglessness, that intelligence proceeded by accident from mindlessness, and that morality proceeded by accident from amorality.  Existentialist philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche was at least honest about the implications of evolution. If evolution, with its law of the survival of the fittest is true, he maintained, then, hate is the noblest of virtues.  The doctrine of evolution assumes (without proof) uniformitarianism, the belief that present geologic processes have always occurred at the same rate of speed.  (Creationists believe that special creation followed by catastrophism is a far better explanation of the evidence we see everywhere in the world. Catastrophism is brilliantly illustrated, for example, in the rapid deposition of strata after the eruption of Mount Saint Helens in 1980.) The doctrine of evolution assumes random, yet upward mobility of life forms through the agency of mutations (information accidents), which are assumed to be beneficial. (Have you ever experienced a beneficial accident?)  These accidental alterations in information advance life forms through “survival of the fittest” sorted out over vast eons of time.  The whole process is said to be illustrated in the fossil record, which starts inexplicably in the “Cambrian explosion” and is astonishingly devoid of transitional life forms, if evolution were actually true.  Though most evolutionists would deny it, evolution has become the essential scientific, academic, and political dogma, which to question is just cause for excommunication from public discourse.  The theory of macro evolution is inimically opposed to and incompatible with the God who has revealed Himself in the Bible. The earliest evolutionists were at least honest enough to admit that the doctrine was invented in part to obviate any responsibility to a Divine Creator. Modern day evolutionists are not nearly as candid. Evolution, in my mind, is one of the biggest hoaxes ever perpetrated on mankind. The progress of evolution in the United States of America has nurtured a galloping cancer in this country. This once great and noble country is rapidly declining into a lobotomized citizenry who willfully suppress the truth and discard God, in the process reaping His wrathful judgment as outlined in Romans 1:18-32. Yet there is always hope for those who believe the Good News (Romans 1:15-17)! If you are interested in discovering reality from God's point of view and participating in the Good News that a loving God has brought to a world of desperately deluded and depraved humans, read Romans chapters 1-8. Romans 9-11 deals with the question of whether or not a faithful God can permanently set aside His special nation, Israel, even with all her faults. Romans 12-16 outlines practical ways people who have embraced God's Good News are exhorted to live as children of light in a dark and depraved world!

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Exegesis.  Accurate explanation of any document, but referring specifically to the Scriptures.  In John 1:18 we read, “No one has seen God at any time; the only begotten God who is in the bosom of the Father, He has explained Him.”  Jesus has accurately explained God.  The word explained is the Greek verb exegeomai, from which comes our English noun exegesis.  Accurate exegesis of Scripture depends on a literal, grammatical, historical interpretation of the text in a process that accounts for figures of speech.  Exegesis is concerned with the intent of the original author of the text.  The opposite of exegesis is eisegesis, which means that the reader reads into Scripture a meaning he has superimposed on the text.  In eisegesis, a reader can force any meaning he wishes on the text, which results in a misinterpretation.  Believers in a fluid or living Constitution, for example, are guilty of eisegesis.  They are guilty of subverting the purpose of the document.  As serious as that is, they are guilty only of destroying a nation.  Those who subvert the intent of the Biblical text are guilty, in many cases, of damning gullible souls to eternal damnation.

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Exile. Judah's seventy-year captivity in Babylon. Though there were times when the nation of Israel worshiped God whole-heartedly, there were many lapses into idolatry. After the division of Israel into the Northern and Southern kingdoms as a judgment against Solomon and his late syncretism into idolatry (1 Kings 11:1-43), both kingdoms succumbed to idolatry.  The Northern Kingdom, known as Israel, had nineteen kings and all were idolatrous. The Southern Kingdom, Judah, was ruled by twenty kings. Only eight were good kings. The other twelve were evil. Assyria deported the Northern Kingdom into captivity in 722 B.C. There was no return. Because there were some good kings, the deportation of Judah was delayed by many years. Babylon conquered and began deporting Jewish people from Judah in 606, 597, and 586 B.C. The Babylonians destroyed the city of Jerusalem and Solomon's Temple in 586, leaving only a handful of Jewish people in the country. In response to the decree of Persia's King Cyrus in 538 B.C. authorizing a return to their homeland, Zerubbabel led the first contingent of Jewish exiles back to Judah in 536 B.C. (Ezra 1:1-6:22). Ezra led a second wave back in 458 B.C. during the reign of Artaxerxes, a later Persian king (Ezra 7:1-10:44). (See the Outline of the Book of Ezra.) Nehemiah returned in 444 B.C. to rebuild the walls of the city of Jerusalem. This event is described in the book of Nehemiah. (See the Outline of the Book of Nehemiah.)



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Updated November 18, 2016

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